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  #41  
Old 12-15-2010, 02:22 AM
Godfrey Godfrey is offline
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Default Wart Zapper Prototype Results

I finished up the wart zapper prototype breadboard circuit, adding the IRF510 Mosfet and 10k resistor. I did get a square wave signal coming out of the drain this time, but found, however that the frequency was off significantly and so was the output voltage. So I started questioning the health of my Mosfet. I didnít have another IRF510 to swap in, so I made due with an IRF3710, which I had on hand. It then worked just the way it should. A 21.6kHz square wave was coming out of the electrodes and the AC voltage measured around 19V on a meter. The circuit ended up looking like so:



I talked my wife into being the first test patient. This time, as we treated her plantar wart, she had an experience similar to that described by Scarborough, where the pain builds up at a particular point, for a short period, but later subsides. Before, with the 25V DC output of the old wart zapper, she would feel a steady pain that was very uncomfortable. This time, however, she commented afterwords that the overall comfort involved was much improved.

- Godfrey
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  #42  
Old 12-15-2010, 03:17 AM
Godfrey Godfrey is offline
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Default Square Wave and Voltage Under Load?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sucahyo View Post
I guess the DC output is the cause of burn mark. The voltage rise high enough until it can burn skin.
Yes, pure DC output of enough voltage and current appears to be destructive of good tissue. Scarboroughís fingernail suffered this fate.

But, even though a cursory glance at Scarboroughís descriptions appear to describe burning, they really donít. They describe a process of decomposition of wart cell structure due to resonance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sucahyo
Richard Loyd add capacitor based on someone else suggestion to create more square wave output when attached to body on 555 based circuit. He add capacitor in series with the probe. I also see some implementation with resistor in paralel with capacitor, both in series with the probe. Maybe this can help.
Found Richard Loydís website and discovered copious zapper plans/descriptions I never knew about. Thanks, you always get me looking into new things!

But in this case, are you really talking about Dr. Gary Gearís observations and Dr. Bill Biagioliís zapper augmentations on this page? :

http://www.royalrife.com/zapper727.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sucahyo
Since DC can do the trick, I think stingo after the diode is much lethal solution lol. Remember to reduce the output voltage if you use stingo after diode....

BTW, I cure another case of red skin athlete's foot with bearable zapping with stingo before diode. This one take longer time to notice the healing though.
I intend to experiment with the Stingo circuit this way too, after Iím done exploring the Scarborough design. If it can cure athleteís foot, it also should do something to warts, etc.

My problem with the Stingo right now is that frequency is less controllable and limited to a certain range and I think frequency is significant in the case of wart zapping.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sucahyo View Post
I wonder if you can test your current circuit with a capacitor in series with the electrode, and see if it still produce DC? Because the cap would block DC current.
In the article with the link I just mentioned, note the following:

ďThere is a third problem that Dr. Gary Gear noticed. The zapper does not produce a square wave under load. The wave looks square on a scope until a person is attached. Then the corners go very round.Ē

I havenít yet looked at the output on a scope while the circuit is zapping someone. Thatís the first step. Then I will try your suggestion.

- Godfrey
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  #43  
Old 12-15-2010, 06:47 PM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default Re: Wart Zapper Prototype Results

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I talked my wife into being the first test patient. This time, as we treated her plantar wart, she had an experience similar to that described by Scarborough, where the pain builds up at a particular point, for a short period, but later subsides. Before, with the 25V DC output of the old wart zapper, she would feel a steady pain that was very uncomfortable. This time, however, she commented afterwords that the overall comfort involved was much improved.
That is nice improvement .

Why there is no resistor between 555 output and the mosfet?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
But, even though a cursory glance at Scarborough’s descriptions appear to describe burning, they really don’t. They describe a process of decomposition of wart cell structure due to resonance.
I believe damage cell hurt more too when zapping.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
But in this case, are you really talking about Dr. Gary Gear’s observations and Dr. Bill Biagioli’s zapper augmentations on this page? :

http://www.royalrife.com/zapper727.html
I heard it from Richard Loyd interview. He mention that people can get better even if people use arbitrary frequency. He mention that we may have better success with device that have the frequency wandering around. He mention that the frequency need to be very exact. Rife use the most expensive frequency generator. But Richard Loyd mention people who use junky frequency generator may have better chance to hit the spot. He said it to be better than just scanning each hz for a very precise frequency generator.

Maybe like stingo, when we grab the probe harder, it change frequency lol.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I intend to experiment with the Stingo circuit this way too, after I’m done exploring the Scarborough design. If it can cure athlete’s foot, it also should do something to warts, etc.
I got some repeated succes with it. Although not as I would expect it. Maybe I need cap in series too...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
My problem with the Stingo right now is that frequency is less controllable and limited to a certain range and I think frequency is significant in the case of wart zapping.
Ok. But how can we know that? In the world of resonance, slightly off is forbidden isn't it?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I haven’t yet looked at the output on a scope while the circuit is zapping someone. That’s the first step. Then I will try your suggestion.
Ok, thanks. I will look forward for the result .


BTW, I am beginning to wonder if using toroid for radiant sleeping aid is a bad decision. I get worse result than when I use transformer, but I will do more experiment to be sure.
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  #44  
Old 12-21-2010, 09:31 PM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default Re: Health Zapper Circuits - DIY and Experimentation

Forgot to mention. Few days ago I apply stingo before the diode with cap in series for another case of red skin athlete's foot. It healed but not right away, it take few days. It was treated with topical for many weeks and still do not heal.

So, I will always use cap isolated before the diode from now on. Not sure if it has to be painless or not, I use it with tolerable pain....


Last edited by sucahyo; 12-21-2010 at 10:27 PM.
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  #45  
Old 12-30-2010, 10:22 PM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default radiant sleeping aid for wall adapter

I found out yesterday that the non grounded water may have different voltage potential compare to ground with different circuit powered with computer power supply.

The top one produce negative offset. The bottom one produce positive offset. Offset apply to both positive/negative output, one is of course higher than other.

So, in case we use adaptor or other wall power supply, I suggest the top version:


On battery charging measurement, stingo2pnp radiant negative output is 5.6V more negative than source positive.

So with stingo2pnp (top circuit) it is easier to has the non grounded water to be more negative. With stingo1pnp (bottom circuit) it is easier to have non grounded water to be more positive.


Since radiant sleeping aid is trying to make the bed more negative than non grounded water, the top version is better. Although it seem power consumption is high with 3V.

Last edited by sucahyo; 12-31-2010 at 12:58 AM.
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  #46  
Old 01-04-2011, 11:05 PM
Godfrey Godfrey is offline
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Default Re: radiant sleeping aid for wall adapter

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
I found out yesterday that the non grounded water may have different voltage potential compare to ground with different circuit powered with computer power supply.

The top one produce negative offset. The bottom one produce positive offset. Offset apply to both positive/negative output, one is of course higher than other.

So, in case we use adaptor or other wall power supply, I suggest the top version:


On battery charging measurement, stingo2pnp radiant negative output is 5.6V more negative than source positive.

So with stingo2pnp (top circuit) it is easier to has the non grounded water to be more negative. With stingo1pnp (bottom circuit) it is easier to have non grounded water to be more positive.


Since radiant sleeping aid is trying to make the bed more negative than non grounded water, the top version is better. Although it seem power consumption is high with 3V.
Hi Sucahyo,

A belated Happy New Years wishes to you, my friend!

I spent the last couple weeks or so under the weather with flu and dealing with storm and work stress, so was delayed in participating.

I notice you have substituted TIP41C for the TIP31C, and put in an extra transistor. Will try this new config with a wallwart when I can spare some time.

Meanwhile, I have used the regular configuration with rechargeable AAA batteries to zap myself quite a bit lately. I have found the recovery diode to be harsh and stingy (I always experience the sting through the radiant negative electrode). So have settled on using open AC type output.

I got caught being busy when the flu set in, so missed the opportunity to make a premptive strike with the zapper, before the flu set in. My wife got the flu too and she tried zapping, but not with as much resolve and regularity as me. It made a difference in a back ache she was complaining about too.

I have to say that there was always a difference after zapping. Certain symptoms, like runny nose would go away immediately. But many symptoms would creep back or be replaced by others. I think that this has to do with various tissues density and reactability. It seems to me certain tissues are not being reached very effectively while others may be overstimulated.

I also suffered some digestive track issues that I think may have been exacerbated by zapping, which seems to decimate good intestinal bacteria. It cleared up when I started eating yogurt.

I recently read some research which claimed that to reach the body electrically, a frequency of greater than 50kHz is required.

- Godfrey
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  #47  
Old 01-05-2011, 12:34 AM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default Re: Health Zapper Circuits - DIY and Experimentation

Happy new year .

About the storm, I would try to connect the radiant positive output to TV antenna and see if it reduce it. Don't use negative or you may make it worse. Just some playing.....

The transistor type is just what I use. Nothing important. The additional transistor is something like Bedini-Cole, and turn out to be different.

Try open output with capacitor in series too.


I think zapper work only on skin surface, so something that goes deep may not get infected. The suggestion from Hulda Clark is in minutes:
7 go - 30 rest - 7 go - 30 rest - 7 go.


I think sharp signal work better than high frequency. But it seems body will muffle the sharp signal. If cap in series can not help, that would be hard.
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  #48  
Old 01-05-2011, 01:41 AM
Godfrey Godfrey is offline
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Default Wart Zapper Prototype Update

I have been delayed in steady work on this project, due to other personal preoccupations lately.

In the time I have been able to spare, I have discovered that even though the signal reaching the gate of the Mosfet seems to be swinging rail to rail, within the voltage range allowed by the zener diode, which in this case is 12V, and looks like this on an OScope:



On a more thorough check of the output, however, voltage measured coming out of the drain, does not sink all the way to 0 volts, but swings from 24V+ to 12V+. Also Mosfets don't have the same output characteristics as bipolar transistors. Here is what I measured with positive probe hooked to 24V+ and negative clip connected to the Mosfet drain, no load, for IRF510 and IRF610:



I think this curly voltage signal translates into a square wave, current-wise, because as the gate reaches Ďsaturationí voltage, the drain voltage first rises and then drops to zero as the drain resistance drops to nothing and resulting current reaches its max. But the voltage signal coming out of an IRF3710 looks classically square like so:



Makes me wonder what is so different between these Mosfets. But in both cases, however, you can see that the output is oscillating between 24V and 12V, rather than dipping all the way to 0V. Now the output from pin 3 of the 555 timer chip work like a pair of complimentary bipolar transistors set up in totem mode to insure that the signal truly swings from rail to rail. But it looks like the gate is floating when low and needs to be pulled down to the negative rail. I think that a complication is arising from the difference between the 12V positive being fed to the 555 timer and the total 24V which is being switched by the Mosfet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Why there is no resistor between 555 output and the mosfet?
Good question, some small resistor value makes sense here, but Scarborough left it out.

I see two issues that complicate the soup. First off, delving into Mosfet specs and switching considerations, it is recommended that the gate receive a maximum voltage, which is looking more like 18V rather than 12V, so the last thing we want to do is drop the signal voltage. Secondly, this simplified timer configuration starts to cause problems when being used both as the RC timing charge and discharge path, as well as for an output signal. I have found that adding a resistor between the output and Mosfet gate causes an unwanted voltage division at the node between it and the other resistor. Increasing this resistor value does not drop the voltage in the direct way expected and starts to degenerate the square shape of the output signal wave.

I think it may be better to use discharge pin 7 for the output signal. This would require the addition of a pull-up resistor connected to the positive rail to work right. The other option, of course, is to use pin 3 as what itís intended for, and use the classic RRC/pin 6/2/7 timer network. This would allow different duty-cycle configurations than just 50% too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
I think it may also happen because of internal mosfet capacitance which hold the voltage steady just like what capacitor do. Did you test it with transistor too?
Yes, the gate of the Mosfet builds up a capacitative charge, which may not be getting properly discharged to allow drain resistance to approach its maximum and shut off current. I discovered an issue with using bipolar transistors instead of Mosfets, however, and that is that their bases require much more current input and this could potentially be a problem when using the low power CMOS timer which only put out 60uA.

I am encountering issues with load too. I donít get an accurate output signal with an unloaded circuit. This is even worse with bipolar transistors, which tend to stay open. I need to emulate the resistance load of the human body which is not a trivial problem. So far Iíve tried an array of LEDs in series with a 1.5M resistor.

One other thing thatís slowing me down and adding much annoyance is the tendency of bnoth my CMOS timer chips and Mosfets to blow out on me, often for no good reason. I actually went through a dozen of both and am waiting on more ordered before I can resume my investigations. Yes, Sucahyo, you warned me about those 555 chips. Well Iím not through with them quite yet, but pretty pissed off about them at the moment ;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
I heard it from Richard Loyd interview. He mention that people can get better even if people use arbitrary frequency. He mention that we may have better success with device that have the frequency wandering around. He mention that the frequency need to be very exact. Rife use the most expensive frequency generator. But Richard Loyd mention people who use junky frequency generator may have better chance to hit the spot. He said it to be better than just scanning each hz for a very precise frequency generator.
And so you keep saying frequency doesnít matter. Maybe you are partly right for zapping purposes, weíll certainly be experimenting more with it. But you are talking to someone who knows from an inner perspective that frequency of vibration plays a significant role in all manifestations of form. So never will you be able to change my mind about that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Maybe like stingo, when we grab the probe harder, it change frequency lol.
From my experimentation, These frequency changes with the stingo only happen w/o the recovery diode and therefore involve AC principles in relationship to load resistance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
I got some repeated succes with it. Although not as I would expect it. Maybe I need cap in series too...
Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Richard Loyd add capacitor based on someone else suggestion to create more square wave output when attached to body on 555 based circuit. He add capacitor in series with the probe. I also see some implementation with resistor in paralel with capacitor, both in series with the probe. Maybe this can help.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I havenít yet looked at the output on a scope while the circuit is zapping someone. Thatís the first step. Then I will try your suggestion.
Ok, thanks. I will look forward for the result .
In my experiments so far, I hooked up the electrodes to myself several times while measuring the output w/scope. Surprisingly, this made little difference one way or other in my findings. It certainly didnít distort the shape of the output signal. This may be due to Loyde using a much lower supply voltage than the wart zapper circuit Iím using.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
But, even though a cursory glance at Scarboroughís descriptions appear to describe burning, they really donít. They describe a process of decomposition of wart cell structure due to resonance.

My problem with the Stingo right now is that frequency is less controllable and limited to a certain range and I think frequency is significant in the case of wart zapping.
Ok. But how can we know that? In the world of resonance, slightly off is forbidden isn't it?
Hee, hee, heeeÖIím having a difficult enough time getting a prototype zapper that actually produces the right square wave signal to worry about frequency accuracy at the moment! But I do intend to have a trim pot in series with the timing resistor to make fine adjustments to frequency in my finalized circuit.

As sensitive as frequency may be, resonance is the unavoidable phenomenon at work here and another fact you canít talk me out of Although I agree that accuracy is a problem.

Meanwhile, Iím waiting for more 555 timer chips to arrive so I can start blowing them up all over again

- Godfrey
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  #49  
Old 01-05-2011, 11:57 PM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default Re: Wart Zapper Prototype Update

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I think this curly voltage signal translates into a square wave, current-wise, because as the gate reaches ‘saturation’ voltage, the drain voltage first rises and then drops to zero as the drain resistance drops to nothing and resulting current reaches its max. But the voltage signal coming out of an IRF3710 looks classically square like so:
Maybe you don't really saturate it because of the frequency?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I think that a complication is arising from the difference between the 12V positive being fed to the 555 timer and the total 24V which is being switched by the Mosfet.
What is the saturation voltage ON and OFF for your MOSFET?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Increasing this resistor value does not drop the voltage in the direct way expected and starts to degenerate the square shape of the output signal wave.
Maybe need voltage divider too (between source positive and source negative)?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I discovered an issue with using bipolar transistors instead of Mosfets, however, and that is that their bases require much more current input and this could potentially be a problem when using the low power CMOS timer which only put out 60uA.
I see. I guess I should try MOSFET too. I have some from Ben, but don't dare to try it yet.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I am encountering issues with load too. I don’t get an accurate output signal with an unloaded circuit. This is even worse with bipolar transistors, which tend to stay open. I need to emulate the resistance load of the human body which is not a trivial problem. So far I’ve tried an array of LEDs in series with a 1.5M resistor.
Maybe need capacitor and coil too?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
One other thing that’s slowing me down and adding much annoyance is the tendency of bnoth my CMOS timer chips and Mosfets to blow out on me, often for no good reason. I actually went through a dozen of both and am waiting on more ordered before I can resume my investigations. Yes, Sucahyo, you warned me about those 555 chips. Well I’m not through with them quite yet, but pretty pissed off about them at the moment ;)
Maybe you should treat human body like a coil and add recovery diode lol. Who know it can be strong enough to lit a LED...........



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
And so you keep saying frequency doesn’t matter. Maybe you are partly right for zapping purposes, we’ll certainly be experimenting more with it. But you are talking to someone who knows from an inner perspective that frequency of vibration plays a significant role in all manifestations of form. So never will you be able to change my mind about that.
No, that quote means that we have to hit the exact frequency. The problem is the device may not be super accurate enough to exactly dial that exact frequency. Richard Loyd is saying that because of this problem, people who use device with wandering will actually get more chance of getting the correct frequency because they have more chance hitting the spot.

Imagine an accurate frequency generator that has step of 5 Hz at 1MHz (device with accuracy of 99.9995%). what is the chance it can hit 1,000,002MHz when you sweep the frequency?

This is why we urgently need a way to know the effect. Like link posted by theremart:
http://www.grayfieldoptical.com/

Watch the movie. It show virus like rife.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
From my experimentation, These frequency changes with the stingo only happen w/o the recovery diode and therefore involve AC principles in relationship to load resistance.
I observe it on radiant sleeping aid too. The coil sing differently when my wife lift the terminal that submerge in non grounded water.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
In my experiments so far, I hooked up the electrodes to myself several times while measuring the output w/scope. Surprisingly, this made little difference one way or other in my findings. It certainly didn’t distort the shape of the output signal. This may be due to Loyde using a much lower supply voltage than the wart zapper circuit I’m using.
I see, thanks .



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Hee, hee, heee…I’m having a difficult enough time getting a prototype zapper that actually produces the right square wave signal to worry about frequency accuracy at the moment! But I do intend to have a trim pot in series with the timing resistor to make fine adjustments to frequency in my finalized circuit.

As sensitive as frequency may be, resonance is the unavoidable phenomenon at work here and another fact you can’t talk me out of Although I agree that accuracy is a problem.
Read my post above . I believe in virus resonant frequency too.

Can you trust your frequency guesser accuracy?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Meanwhile, I’m waiting for more 555 timer chips to arrive so I can start blowing them up all over again
Lol,



BTW, seen any capacity increase on the rechargeable battery?



Some rambling:
While I fix a computer of a fellow co worker, he mention often receive pain in the head, sometimes make them collapse. He also mention can only sleep 4 hour a day. Hearing the story make me regret that I still had only very minor knowledge in this. I still not confident enough to tell about radiant sleeping aid, because I don't know if he can accept it as science, not as voodoo...

Last edited by sucahyo; 01-06-2011 at 12:23 AM.
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  #50  
Old 01-09-2011, 01:52 AM
Godfrey Godfrey is offline
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Default Re: Wart Zapper Prototype Update

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Maybe you don't really saturate it because of the frequency?
Hmmm. I don't know. These Mosfets are pretty fast. Besides, it doesn't seem to be a problem to open them up to full current, the problem seems to be how to fully turn them off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
What is the saturation voltage ON and OFF for your MOSFET?
10V and 0V for all of them, i.e. IRF510, IRF610 and IRF3710. So according to the specs, 12V aught to do it, but in forums, some people are saying that 15V-18V works better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Maybe need voltage divider too (between source positive and source negative)?
Hmmm, Iíll consider it. I've been thinking of adding such resistors just to help pulling-up and pulling-down to the rails.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
I see. I guess I should try MOSFET too. I have some from Ben, but don't dare to try it yet.
For what application? BTW, I've been thinking a pair of matched bipolar transistors in Stingo configuration is very close to a totem pole. It might be a fast/efficient rail-to-rail switch. Could feed the PNP base with the pin 3 output, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Maybe need capacitor and coil too?
I think I see what youíre getting at. Emulate body impedance, not just resistance. I wouldnít know where to start with values or type of coil. Body resistance is measurable to a certain degree, but how do you measure its capacitance or inductance?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Maybe you should treat human body like a coil and add recovery diode lol. Who know it can be strong enough to lit a LED...........
Iím not sure LED is the best load to testÖjust had them on hand. A body conducts A/C, so why a diode?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
No, that quote means that we have to hit the exact frequency. The problem is the device may not be super accurate enough to exactly dial that exact frequency. Richard Loyd is saying that because of this problem, people who use device with wandering will actually get more chance of getting the correct frequency because they have more chance hitting the spot.
Iím trying to make the frequency as accurate as possible for now, but incorporating a small sweep might make sense. I also wonder if eventually Clarkís Synchrometer might be able to provide feedback to a circuit to dynamically calibrate an exact frequency on the fly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Imagine an accurate frequency generator that has step of 5 Hz at 1MHz (device with accuracy of 99.9995%). what is the chance it can hit 1,000,002MHz when you sweep the frequency?
Point takenÖexact frequency may be critical and hard to nail. Doesnít make frequency any less important.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
This is why we urgently need a way to know the effect. Like link posted by theremart:
http://www.grayfieldoptical.com/
Those high-powered optical microscopes would certainly be great to look through, like Rife was able, and see viruses reacting real-time, but weíre not likely to have that opportunity anytime soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Read my post above . I believe in virus resonant frequency too.
Ok, but not sure which post you mean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Can you trust your frequency guesser accuracy?
Not entirely sure what you mean. The 21.27kHz is indeed a guess by Scarborough, but based on Craneís research. No, I have no way of knowing for sure what is the right frequency, but wanted to try this one for starters. As I said previously, I would like to try 2.127kHz also.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
BTW, seen any capacity increase on the rechargeable battery?
Do you mean when using a Stingo? I havenít been recharging with a Stingo yet, but have been using AAA rechargeable batteries in standard charger. Have realized that I exaggerated the limitations due to not fully understanding the high self-discharge tendency of nimh batteries. They donít store a charge well, but work satisfactorily if you use them right away.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Some rambling:
While I fix a computer of a fellow co worker, he mention often receive pain in the head, sometimes make them collapse. He also mention can only sleep 4 hour a day. Hearing the story make me regret that I still had only very minor knowledge in this. I still not confident enough to tell about radiant sleeping aid, because I don't know if he can accept it as science, not as voodoo...
It would be wisest, in my opinion, to keep our enthusiasm to share in check. One can be held accountable for someoneís health conditionsÖvoodoo or not.

- Godfrey
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  #51  
Old 01-09-2011, 09:26 PM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default Re: Wart Zapper Prototype Update

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Hmmm. I don't know. These Mosfets are pretty fast. Besides, it doesn't seem to be a problem to open them up to full current, the problem seems to be how to fully turn them off.

10V and 0V for all of them, i.e. IRF510, IRF610 and IRF3710. So according to the specs, 12V aught to do it, but in forums, some people are saying that 15V-18V works better.

Hmmm, I’ll consider it. I've been thinking of adding such resistors just to help pulling-up and pulling-down to the rails.
Thanks. I think you should try gmeast circuit posted at this is it thread at EF.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
For what application?
Stingo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
BTW, I've been thinking a pair of matched bipolar transistors in Stingo configuration is very close to a totem pole. It might be a fast/efficient rail-to-rail switch. Could feed the PNP base with the pin 3 output, right?
I don't know what you mean. But yours and 7imix scope show that stingo produce 1% duty cycle, so it would still be the same if driven with timer.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I think I see what you’re getting at. Emulate body impedance, not just resistance. I wouldn’t know where to start with values or type of coil. Body resistance is measurable to a certain degree, but how do you measure its capacitance or inductance?
using it part of circuit?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I’m not sure LED is the best load to test…just had them on hand. A body conducts A/C, so why a diode?
Agree.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I’m trying to make the frequency as accurate as possible for now, but incorporating a small sweep might make sense. I also wonder if eventually Clark’s Synchrometer might be able to provide feedback to a circuit to dynamically calibrate an exact frequency on the fly.
I now think that syncrometer is a detector of energy pattern. So to detect something inside our body, you must have the code/source to detect.

Since it require 30 second between reading, it may give longer sweep of frequency.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Those high-powered optical microscopes would certainly be great to look through, like Rife was able, and see viruses reacting real-time, but we’re not likely to have that opportunity anytime soon.
The video provide some basic to cancer theory too, make sure to watch the video too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Ok, but not sure which post you mean.
Basically I believe correct frequency is important too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Not entirely sure what you mean. The 21.27kHz is indeed a guess by Scarborough, but based on Crane’s research. No, I have no way of knowing for sure what is the right frequency, but wanted to try this one for starters. As I said previously, I would like to try 2.127kHz also.
I mean yours. How accurate is the frequency guessing of your scope?

However, I just remember that resonant frequency usually change on different environment. Maybe it is better to sweep 5% from the exact one.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Do you mean when using a Stingo? I haven’t been recharging with a Stingo yet, but have been using AAA rechargeable batteries in standard charger. Have realized that I exaggerated the limitations due to not fully understanding the high self-discharge tendency of nimh batteries. They don’t store a charge well, but work satisfactorily if you use them right away.
That is a bit weird. How long can your nimh power the stingo. Three days with 40V output?

I don't notice high enough self discharge though. I can use it even if it sit for a week.

BTW, use the partial cap isolated FWBR version for stingo charging.

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Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
It would be wisest, in my opinion, to keep our enthusiasm to share in check. One can be held accountable for someone’s health conditions…voodoo or not.
Ok. thanks .
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  #52  
Old 01-10-2011, 02:28 AM
Godfrey Godfrey is offline
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Default Wart Zapper - The latest

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
...I think you should try gmeast circuit posted at this is it thread at EF.
A circuit to try...did not understand...where is it posted?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Stingo.
You mean a Stingo circuit with Mosfets instead of transistors? Interesting

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
I don't know what you mean.
A Ďtotem poleí, or Ďpush-pull outputí, is a pair of complimentary bipolar transistors configured to switch a signal rail to railÖ.the PNP on top, sourcing current to the positive rail and NPN underneath, sinking to the negative rail. This helps amplify a low powered logic signal, or pull up or down one that floats. Itís often used to drive Mosfets and is how output pin #3 is supposed to act on a 555 timer. But now that I think more on it, in this case, both transistor bases take the signal in parallel, not one cascading in series into the other like the Stingo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
But yours and 7imix scope show that stingo produce 1% duty cycle, so it would still be the same if driven with timer.
Yup, true! Which makes it excellent for many things, but has limitations for certain other applications.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
using it part of circuit?
Huh?? The only reason Iíd put any of this in the circuit is to test the output under as realistic conditions as possible. I am wondering here how to measure such characteristics in the human body to come up with as accurate a load emulation as possible. I will, of course, just have to wing it and guess about what components would imitate the bodyís capacitative and inductive reactance, whereas you can measure the bodyís resistance directly with a multimeter.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
I now think that syncrometer is a detector of energy pattern. So to detect something inside our body, you must have the code/source to detect.
Indeed, but I get this picture in my head of a device that measures frequency by contact just before it repeats the frequency back in output pulses. Iím just day dreaming

Energy patterns, on my opinion, are made up of wave forms with characteristics involving shape, frequency and amplitude. Furthermore, all form is ultimately energetically based.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Since it require 30 second between reading, it may give longer sweep of frequency.
??

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Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
The video provide some basic to cancer theory too, make sure to watch the video too.
You mean this video? http://www.grayfieldoptical.com/symb...arasitism.html Saw part of it w/o sound. Will view again w/sound.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Basically I believe correct frequency is important too.
Good! BTW, one must be able to reach resonance with 555 timers. Itís being done all the time now with hydrogen generators. I corresponded early on with Dave Lawton. In 2004 he sent me a basic version of his PWM circuit which cracks water molecules by reaching the resonant frequency of H20. In his videos, prototypes generated huge amounts of gas which could be seen boiling up out of the water.

So it shouldnít be anymore difficult to reach the resonant frequency of a virus or parasite once accurately determined.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
I mean yours. How accurate is the frequency guessing of your scope?
Good point to bring up as it emphasizes just how much normal tolerances could throw things off. Well, I could probably look that up in the documentation. Iím pretty sure itís fairly accurate as long as the frequency is under its 1 MHz sampling rate. But I have no other device to compare its accuracy to. My old analog scope has no dependable measurement scales. I have considered getting a multimeter that measures frequency just for that purpose.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
However, I just remember that resonant frequency usually change on different environment. Maybe it is better to sweep 5% from the exact one.
Yes, even better if the actual local frequency can be determined, like with the synchrometer. But it could be as simple as having a potentiometer to sweep/search manually. The wart might display a physical reaction when the right frequency is hit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
That is a bit weird. How long can your nimh power the stingo. Three days with 40V output?
I have the 3V sleeper Stingo tuned, not for efficiency, but to generate the largest spikes, which are between 60-80 Volts. Thereís a lot of space in between those pulses, though, so I donít know how many volts of constant output that represents. I would say that a pair of my 1000mAh 1.2V NIMH rechargeable batteries last between 20-30 hours.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
BTW, use the partial cap isolated FWBR version for stingo charging.
Is this a new configuration?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sucahyo View Post
Ok. thanks .
I was just talking to a coworker who is suffering from a sinus infection. I was so tempted to talk about zapping and colloidal silver, which have virtually eradicated such infections from my life. But had to restrain myself for the reasons weíve been discussing.

I have been looking at Dave Lawtonís latest PWM circuit as well as another hydrogen generator: http://www.making-hydrogen.com/hydro...et-irf510.html

Iíve noticed that both use a resistor between the gate and output pin 3 and another resistor to pull down. Seems to solve just the problem Iíve been experiencing. Iíve got a new supply of timer chips and Mosfets to experiment with, so will try this out soon.

- Godfrey
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  #53  
Old 01-10-2011, 07:05 PM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default Re: Wart Zapper - The latest

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
A circuit to try...did not understand...where is it posted?
here
Quote:
Here is EXACTLY what I am running. Now I think you won't beat me up next time you see me. You do indeed need an oscilloscope to tune this thing though. I've learned to do it by feeling the heat of the MOSFET. When it hits room temperature and still running, I'm there.

Here is a PDF of my circuit. I can't say it's 'mine' because these circuits are floating around all over:
http://02d1852.netsolhost.com/radian...r_N-MOSFET.pdf

The resistor and cap values differ from the generic circuit I originally posted re: Op-Amp PWM. That circuit uses 3 Op-Amps with no adjustment but they tell you what does what. So resistor R is a variable resistor for frequency control. I messed with the ratio of R1 & R2 until I had a higher-amplitude triangle wave ... that made short PW easier for the comparator. Since I am using a logic-level MOSFET, I needed to add the offset output buffer (U1D) and resistor network (110 ohm resistor set). I'm not using a choke after the diode 1N5408 'cause I still don't know what it's for.
It turn out to be similar to Lawton solution......



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
You mean a Stingo circuit with Mosfets instead of transistors? Interesting
I don't know if it will work though, may need Lawton trick too.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
A ‘totem pole’, or ‘push-pull output’, is a pair of complimentary bipolar transistors configured to switch a signal rail to rail….the PNP on top, sourcing current to the positive rail and NPN underneath, sinking to the negative rail. This helps amplify a low powered logic signal, or pull up or down one that floats. It’s often used to drive Mosfets and is how output pin #3 is supposed to act on a 555 timer. But now that I think more on it, in this case, both transistor bases take the signal in parallel, not one cascading in series into the other like the Stingo.
I see. thanks for the explanation.





Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Huh?? The only reason I’d put any of this in the circuit is to test the output under as realistic conditions as possible. I am wondering here how to measure such characteristics in the human body to come up with as accurate a load emulation as possible. I will, of course, just have to wing it and guess about what components would imitate the body’s capacitative and inductive reactance, whereas you can measure the body’s resistance directly with a multimeter.
I mean you use your body to replace, for instance, the capacitor of 555 circuit and use the scope to guess what capacitor value is similar to your body.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Indeed, but I get this picture in my head of a device that measures frequency by contact just before it repeats the frequency back in output pulses. I’m just day dreaming

Energy patterns, on my opinion, are made up of wave forms with characteristics involving shape, frequency and amplitude. Furthermore, all form is ultimately energetically based.
Maybe you need to add aether too in that, because syncrometer can differentiate metal or even water too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
??
Syncrometer require 20 seconds rest before doing another measurement to "reset" human charge, 2 seconds for measurement, another 8 second to think the result lol. Suppose we use frequency sweeping with dial, then we have to wait 30 second before change the dial to see if the virus is gone or not.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
You mean this video? http://www.grayfieldoptical.com/symb...arasitism.html Saw part of it w/o sound. Will view again w/sound.
Yes, the explanation is amazing knowledge too.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Good! BTW, one must be able to reach resonance with 555 timers. It’s being done all the time now with hydrogen generators. I corresponded early on with Dave Lawton. In 2004 he sent me a basic version of his PWM circuit which cracks water molecules by reaching the resonant frequency of H20. In his videos, prototypes generated huge amounts of gas which could be seen boiling up out of the water.

So it shouldn’t be anymore difficult to reach the resonant frequency of a virus or parasite once accurately determined.
Yes, should be easier .




Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Yes, even better if the actual local frequency can be determined, like with the synchrometer. But it could be as simple as having a potentiometer to sweep/search manually. The wart might display a physical reaction when the right frequency is hit.
What if the reaction is your body resonant instead of pathogen resonant?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I have the 3V sleeper Stingo tuned, not for efficiency, but to generate the largest spikes, which are between 60-80 Volts. There’s a lot of space in between those pulses, though, so I don’t know how many volts of constant output that represents. I would say that a pair of my 1000mAh 1.2V NIMH rechargeable batteries last between 20-30 hours.
I see, that is long enough.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
Is this a new configuration?
Not newest, here:


charged battery replace the resistor at the left.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Godfrey View Post
I have been looking at Dave Lawton’s latest PWM circuit as well as another hydrogen generator: http://www.making-hydrogen.com/hydro...et-irf510.html

I’ve noticed that both use a resistor between the gate and output pin 3 and another resistor to pull down. Seems to solve just the problem I’ve been experiencing. I’ve got a new supply of timer chips and Mosfets to experiment with, so will try this out soon.
Interesting, thanks for the link.


I hope we can achieve something that we can confidently suggest to everyone .
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  #54  
Old 02-10-2011, 08:00 PM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default Re: Health Zapper Circuits - DIY and Experimentation

Yesterday my son was sick. His body is hot but he still look healthy. I decide to use 3V stingo zapper before diode with toroid. After under 10 minutes of use his body temperature cooled down.

Also got serious muscle tension that make me almost unable to let go the electrode when accidently dial full power when tuning the output power. Don't underestimate a 3V stingo guys......


I also tried to power radiant sleeping aid with 12V power supply. I use bedini cole stingo, where coil is isolated from power with NPN and PNP. It output about 500V measured with analog. I got jolted when I touch the water in the bucket. The water only had the postive output terminal. Negative terminal un connected.

It seems that the ground become ghost negative polarity. The reason I use bedini cole version is because the negative output is more negative than ground.


The result for sleep seems weaker than 3V toroid version. So I will use 3V in the future.
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  #55  
Old 08-26-2011, 07:28 PM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default Re: Health Zapper Circuits - DIY and Experimentation

Here is a small modification to the circuit that will increase the frequency a little.


My son and wife impression on this circuit is this circuit make them sleepy.

I have use this version on non painfull setting but still high enough to produce singing at the contact pad.

I have seen injury can be recovered faster. Inflamatory will reduce, red and yellow wet part will be dry the next day.

I found that I do not have to use it at painfull setting at all. Flues, fever can be reduced in an instant.
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  #56  
Old 08-26-2011, 10:23 PM
sucahyo sucahyo is offline
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Default Re: Health Zapper Circuits - DIY and Experimentation

Here is how I package my zapper.

This video also shows interesting current consumption. The output voltage still high at spesific value.

"Here is a video showing my portable circuit. LED is in parallel with the battery.

As I turn the potentiometer, the LED start to get dimmer, indicating lowered battery voltage as the circuit draw more current from the battery.

But interestingly, at spesific point, the LED goes brighter. Beyond or before that point, the LED will still be dim.

Notice that the output voltage do not drop when the LED at its brightest at the spesific point."

Youtube - Resonance?
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